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News & Press: Renewables

Downloading daylight: Higginsville solar farm dedicated Dec. 6

Wednesday, December 13, 2017   (0 Comments)
Posted by: mpuaonline
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Spirits were bright Dec. 6 in Higginsville as city leaders gathered with project partners to cut a ceremonial ribbon marking the opening of the ninth utility-scale solar energy farm whose power is purchased for the Missouri Public Energy Pool (MoPEP). 

 

The dedication of the Higginsville Solar Energy Farm marked a completion and “grand opening” of the newest solar generation collaboration involving the 35 cities in MoPEP. The municipal projects spearheading Missouri’s leadership in solar generation include facilities developed since 2014 through a partnership coordinated by the Missouri Public Utility Alliance (MPUA), and project partners MC Power Companies Inc. and Gardner Capital. 

 

Solar farms previously developed and completed by the partners are in the MoPEP member municipalities of Butler, Chillicothe, Lebanon, Macon, Marshall, Rolla, Trenton, and Waynesville.

 

Situated right on the north side of Interstate 70, the 3.19-megawatt (DC) Higginsville site has 9,720 solar panels spreading across 22 acres, easily seen by traffic passing by on the interstate. Completion of the farm signals the continued commitment of Missouri’s municipal utilities to solar energy production as a portion of their power portfolio. The addition of the solar generation sites helps meet ongoing goals of improving MoPEP’s long term price stability, and further diversifies the pool’s generation.

 

Missouri’s municipal utilities now generate a majority of the utility-scale solar power in Missouri. The partners broke ground in October for a 3.09-megawatt solar farm in Farmington, which should be producing power in early 2018. Another site is planned for El Dorado Springs. In addition to MPUA/MoPEP’s solar initiatives, other municipally-based solar farms are owned or operated separately by utilities in Springfield, Columbia, Independence, and the Nixa, where the city dedicated Missouri’s largest solar farm on Nov. 14.

 

All told, the Missouri Joint Municipal Utility Commission (MJMEUC), a part of MPUA, now produces or contracts for more than 55 megawatts of renewable energy from solar, wind, and landfill gas resources, in addition to 24 MW of contracted hydro power, for a MoPEP summer peak of 530 MW.  In addition to the MoPEP solar farms, the Commission receives energy from three landfill gas plants (Springfield, Lamar, & near Hartville), two award-winning combined heat and power facilities (Macon and La

Spirits were bright Dec. 6 in Higginsville as city leaders gathered with project partners to cut a ceremonial ribbon marking the opening of the ninth utility-scale solar energy farm whose power is purchased for the Missouri Public Energy Pool (MoPEP). 

 

The dedication of the Higginsville Solar Energy Farm marked a completion and “grand opening” of the newest solar generation collaboration involving the 35 cities in MoPEP. The municipal projects spearheading Missouri’s leadership in solar generation include facilities developed since 2014 through a partnership coordinated by the Missouri Public Utility Alliance (MPUA), and project partners MC Power Companies Inc. and Gardner Capital. 

 

Previous solar farms developed and completed by the partners are in the MoPEP member municipalities of Butler, Chillicothe, Lebanon, Macon, Marshall, Rolla, Trenton, and Waynesville.

 

Situated right on the north side of Interstate 70, the 3.19-megawatt (DC) Higginsville site has 9,720 solar panels spreading across 22 acres, easily seen by traffic passing by on the interstate. Completion of the farm signals the continued commitment of Missouri’s municipal utilities to solar energy production as a portion of their power portfolio. The addition of the solar generation sites helps meet ongoing goals of improving MoPEP’s long term price stability, and further diversifies the pool’s generation.

 

Missouri’s municipal utilities now generate a majority of the utility-scale solar power in Missouri. The partners broke ground in October for a 3.09-megawatt solar farm in Farmington, which should be producing power in early 2018. Another site is planned for El Dorado Springs. In addition to MPUA/MoPEP’s solar initiatives, other municipally-based solar farms are owned or operated separately by utilities in Springfield, Columbia, Independence, and the Nixa, where the city dedicated Missouri’s largest solar farm on Nov. 14.

 

All told, the Missouri Joint Municipal Utility Commission (MJMEUC), a part of MPUA, now produces or contracts for more than 55 megawatts of renewable energy from solar, wind, and landfill gas resources, in addition to 24 MW of contracted hydro power, for a MoPEP summer peak of 530 MW.  In addition to the MoPEP solar farms, the Commission receives energy from three landfill gas plants (Springfield, Lamar, & near Hartville), two award-winning combined heat and power facilities (Macon and Laddonia), a wind farm in Rock Port, and contracts for additional wind power from a wind farm in Kansas.


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